Manual-English

How to Use the Manual and Download Puppy | How to Run Puppy | Saving and Installing to Hard Disk | Preparing the Hard Disk | Installation-Frugal | Installation-Full | Internet Connection | Setup EMail | Setup Devices (Printer, Keyboard)

The links above are parts of a Puppy Linux manual in English provided and updated by volunteers.

The newest installation tutorial in PDF is about Lucid Puppy 5.2.8, prepared by Md. Hanbala in Arabic, click here to get it, or click to get English or Bahasa. Note that the installation method is very similar among Puppy Linux distros.

There is a book by Grant Wilson about Puppy 4.2 downloadable as PDF, click here. Pay attention to the NOTE below about version numbering (naming pup_xxx.sfs was changed in version 4.3.1).

A good tutorial for USB install of Puppy Linux 4.30 is made available as PDF (English, also Italian and Spanish) by Alex Gotev for Linux Day 09 - GALLUG, October 24, 2009, Novara, Italy.

NOTE that the version number used in the manual below is 4.00, and version numbering is shown as 400 (when used with filenames). You should replace this with the latest version number, like 4.21 or 421 (Use the number with filenames, like pup_421.sfs).
IMPORTANT: With version 431, use dash instead of underscore, like pup-431.sfs. Starting April 23, 2011, long filenames are used for puppy.sfs in Puppy Linux, and there is a file /etc/DISTRO_SPECS that helps to identify the matching puppy.sfs however it is named (i.e. this helps the start-up become fool-proof.).

Thanks to forum members Oliver (oli), Rod (cryftybytes), Jay (puppyluvr) and Bill (BillWho?).


How to Use the Manual and Download Puppy

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Introduction

This manual will appeal to Linux beginners and Linux users, who would like to become acquainted with Puppy Linux. This manual summarizes the most important information for Puppy beginners and explains the first steps with Puppy.

How to use the manual:

Menu entries and buttons are set in "". Sub-menus are separated by vertical lines. Example: "Menu | Shut Down | JWM restart" means, that you first click on the button "Menu", than (at the appearing menu) on the headword "Shut Down" and finally on the headword "JWM restart".

In the manual the letter x is used as a substitute symbol for a number. For example /dev/hdax means that you have to write /dev/hda1, /dev/hda2 or /dev/hda3 - just use what suits your computer.

With the term "shell" the program "Menu | Run | Rxvt terminal emulator" is meant.

How to get Puppy

You can get Puppy Linux from ibiblio.org. Save the current release pup-431.iso on your harddrive. The filesize is about 105 MB.
To make sure that you downloaded a genuine original file, you can compare the checksum of the ISO file with the associated file pup-431-md5sum.txt. (right-click to download this file as well).

Within Linux:

Open a shell and change into the directory, in which you stored the two files. Enter the following command:

md5sum -c pup-431-md5sum.txt

This will run the md5sum program on your .iso file and compare it with the value in the .txt file. You should get an OK. If not you need to download the iso again.

Within Windows:

Download the DOS-Program md5sum.exe and save it in the same directory where you saved the downloaded files.

To open a DOS-Box click on "Start | Run". This opens an input window, into which you enter the following command:

cmd



Now you get a DOS-Box. Change into the directory in which you stored the two files, e.g. c:/pup431. Enter these commands:
c:
cd pup431



dir

Now you should see the Puppy-files (make sure that you copy md5sum.exe to this same location). Next, enter the command:

md5sum.exe -c pup-431-md5sum.txt

You should get an "OK".

Subsequently you burn the ISO file (in our example, pup-431.iso) on CD. To burn an ISO file on CD, consult the manual of your CD-burning software. Beginners sometimes copy the ISO file simply as a data-file on CD, which doesn’t work. Usually the CD-burning software has a special menu option for burning an ISO file on CD. You can verify whether you burned the CD correctly by looking at the CD with the file manager (e.g. Windows Explorer). If you see files as "initrd.gz" or "vmlinuz" everything is OK. If you see the file "pup-431.iso" (an ISO filename) this is incorrect.

A small and excellent CD burning program for Windows is BurnCDCC - just download, unzip to a folder in Windows and click on burncdcc.exe (do not forget to choose low burning speed of 4X for CD or 1X for DVD).

Tip:

Create a second, identical Puppy CD as a backup copy, in case the original CD becomes corrupted.

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How to Run Puppy

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A great advantage of Puppy Linux is that Puppy doesn't have to be installed. You can run Puppy directly from the CD, without affecting your operating system. Alternatively you can install Puppy on a harddrive or a USB stick.

How to run Puppy the very first time

First you must set up the boot sequence in the BIOS. If you do not know how to get into the BIOS-setup, consult the computers manual. Usually you press one of the following keys immediately after switching on the PC: ESC, one of the function keys F1 to F12 or the delete key. At the BIOS-setup you change the boot sequence so that the CD-ROM drive is first and the harddrive is second. Close the BIOS-setup and store the settings.

The PC then usually reboots. Immediately insert the Puppy CD into the CD-ROM drive. If you are too slow your old operating system starts. In this case keep the CD inserted in the CD drive and start the PC again.

Now Puppy should start. During the starting procedure you are requested to choose from a few options such as mouse, country or timezone. The choice for mouse is usually automatic, and you can choose "ps2" even if you have no attached mouse to yout laptop. For other questions, navigate with the cursor keys downward to your choice. Then strike the return-key. Thereafter a further window (Puppy video Wizard) appears, "Xorg" is already highlighted. Press the return-key. Wait some seconds till the next window (Puppy video Wizard) appears. There you navigate with the cursor keys to your screen (LCD panel = flat screen, CRT = standard monitor) and your choice resolution. Then strike the return-key. After some seconds the Puppy desktop appears.

Should Xorg not work on your computer, choose Xvesa. A few seconds later, the Puppy desktop will be displayed using a resolution of 640 x 480 pixels. If you wish to use an even higher resolution choose e.g. 1280x1024x24 and click on the button "Change".

After some seconds the Puppy desktop appears again. Click on the OK-button.

Unfortunately, with Xvesa you will have to adjust the keyboard layout if you are not using a US keyboard.

If your PC has 256 MB RAM, Puppy will be loaded completely into RAM (or mounted to the CD/DVD disk if your PC lacks RAM). Your old operating system is not touched, so that you can look safely at Puppy Linux. Now you can take the CD out of the CD drive, unless you do not have enough ram, in which case Puppy will not allow the CD to be ejected.

If you terminate Puppy you are asked whether you want to store the settings (and your personal files) in two ways (you can change between the options with the tab-key and then and press the return-key):

  • SAVE TO FILE - Save to a file named pup_save.2fs on a hard disk or USB flash drive.
  • SAVE TO CD - Save to the same CD or DVD where you booted from (this requires that the Puppy CD or DVD was burned in a way that files can still be added to it).
  • DO NOT SAVE - Exit Puppy without saving anything.

If you would like to store the settings (and your personal files) you are asked on which hard disk or USB flash drive this should happen. If saving to pup_save.2fs, choose at least 128 MB.

Boot Options

When Puppy boots it offers you some boot-options. If you do not enter anything, Puppy is loaded after some seconds into RAM. When starting, Puppy automatically looks for a previously stored pup_save.2fs-file. If this file doesn't exist yet, you will be asked again the same boot-up questions.

With the boot-option

puppy pfix=ram

you have the option to start Puppy into RAM without your pre-saved-settings and without your personal files even if a pup_save.2fs-file already exists. This boot option is very useful and is used in this manual a few times. The other boot options are normally not needed.

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Saving and Installing to Hard Disk

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How to save the settings and your personal files

So that Puppy can store all settings and your personal data, a file named pup_save.2fs is saved. I recommend a size of 512 MB for this file. This is big enough for further programs and can be backed-up on CD-ROM (note: if you want to backup the file on a USB stick, it must have a storage capacity of 1 GB). Puppy can store the pup_save.2fs-file on many different filesystems including FAT and NTFS as used by windows. (note: USB sticks and external harddrives are usually formatted with a FAT32-filesystem, so that they can be used without problems). Windows XP-users normally have a NTFS-filesystem only. There are two options for you to store the pup_save.2fs-file as well:

(1) Save the file on an external harddrive or USB-stick.

(2) Make the NTFS partition smaller and create one or more further partition with FAT32-filesystem and ext2/ext3-filesystem.

If you intend to use Puppy durably you should select the second alternative. This alternative has many advantages.

How to install Puppy

If you prefer not to keep booting Puppy from CD-ROM, you can install Puppy to a hard disk drive. This requires some preparation.

Hard drives, partitions and filesystems

A hard drive can be divided in one or more partitions. If you create several partitions on a harddrive, each partition appears like a hard drive in the operating system. In other words: although you have only one harddrive in your PC, you will see several (virtual) hard-drives with Windows or Linux. Windows designates the harddrives (as well as the floppy disk drive and CD/DVD drive). In Windows they will be identified with letters. Usually A designates the floppy disk drive, C the harddrive (first partition), D the CD-ROM drive, E the harddrive (second partition), F the harddrive (third partition) and so on. Each partition has its own file system, Windows normally uses NTFS (Windows XP) or FAT32 (Win98, Win95).

With Linux the (first) harddrive is adressed as /dev/hda or /dev/sda. If your PC has a second harddrive, it is adressed as /dev/hdb or /dev/sdb. The partitions are sequentially numbered, starting with one. The partitions of your harddrive are adressed as /dev/hda1 (corresponds to the Windows C-partition), /dev/hda2 (corresponds to the Windows E-partition), /dev/hda3 and so on. Linux can work with different file systems such as ext2, ext3 or ReiserFS. These file systems are not readable by Windows. In addition Linux can work with Windows filesystems too.

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Preparing the Hard Disk

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Defragment your hard disk

Before creating new partitions on your hard drive, you should defragment the drive so that all data is stored at the beginning of the existing partition. Here is how to do it:

Start up Windows.

First, backup your files to CD-ROM, DVD, or an external hard drive. Also remember to backup your Internet link collection (Favourites) and your e-mails. If your data is encrypted, it is advisable to decrypt it before backing it up. This protects you from data loss because modifying hard drive partitions always carries the risk of data loss.

Next, start the Disk Defragmenter program under Windows. The program is located at "Start | All Programs | Utilities | System Programs | Disk Defragmenter". Select hard drive c:\ and click the "Check" button.

Click the "Defragment" button. Depending on the size of the partition and the amount of data on it, this process can take a long time (over an hour). If you have very large amounts of data, you can speed up this process drastically by deleting your files after you have backed them up (see the previous item) and restoring them once you are done with the modifications. In this case, please make sure beforehand that your backup is readable, otherwise there will be wailing and gnashing of teeth.

Click the "Close" button.

There is now space on the harddisk for additional partitions.

Shut down Windows.

Creating partitions

Now you should plan the layout of your hard disk partitions regarding file system and size. I recommend creating three or four partitions in addition to the Windows partition. The following example assumes you have exactly one Windows partition (drive letter C). Your hard disk would then look like this:

First partition: NTFS or FAT32 (Windows)
Second partition: ext2 or ext3 (this is where Puppy will be installied to)
Third partition: Linux swap (for page files)
Fourth partition: FAT32 (for exchanging data between Windows and Linux)
Optionally, a fifth partition: ext2 or ext3 (Linux)

Windows will continue to reside on your first partition with all its programs and data. The second partition (recommended size about 1-2 GB) has a Linux file system (ext2 or ext3). This is the partition Puppy will be installed to. The third partition (exactly as large as your computer's memory) will be a Linux swap partition that Linux can ... well, swap files to. The fourth partition has a FAT32 file system, which is recognized by both Windows and Linux. This partition (recommended size about 5 GB) is used for files that you want to access from both Windows and Linux. If you want to manage large amounts of data under Puppy (e.g. music collection, pictures), you should create a fifth partition with a Linux file system (ext2/ext3). This file system cannot be accessed from Windows and is meant for Linux only.

To create the partitions, proceed as follows:

Start Puppy Linux from CD with the "pfix=ram" boot option.

Start the Gparted program: "Menu | System | Gparted partition manager".

First, shrink your Windows partition (NTFS file system). To do this, select the Windows partition /dev/hda1.

Click the "Resize/Move" button.

Reduce the "New Size" value until the "Free Space Following" field shows enough free space following for the new partitions. My test computer's hard disk has only 3 gigabytes; I am using half of that for the mew partitions. You probably have a much larger hard drive so your partition sizes can be increased accordingly.

Then press the "Resize/Move" button.

Next, select "Edit | Apply All Operations" from the menu.

In the dialogue box that comes up, click the "Apply" button.

Click the "Close" button. You now have an "unallocated" area on your hard disk.

Select the line saying "unallocated" and click the "New" button.

Enter the size of the second partition in the "New Size" field. This is where Puppy Linux will be installed to. I recommend a size of 1 to 2 gigabytes (i.e., 1024 to 2048 MB). Select ext2 from the "Filesystem" box and click "Add".

Again select the line saying "unallocated" and click the "New" button. (You can see where this is going.)

Enter the size of the third partition in the "New Size" field. This partition is to hold Linux's swap files as a Linux swap partition. You should make it as large as your computer's memory (RAM). With my test computer, this amounts to 128 megabytes (MB). Select linux-swap from the "Filesystem" box and click "Add".

Again select the line saying "unallocated" and click the "New" button.

Enter the size of the fourth partition in the "New Size" field.This partition is meant for shared access to files from Windows and Linux. I recommend a size of about 5 gigabytes (5120 MB). Since my test computer does not have a large enough hard disk, I am using 396 megabytes (MB) as an example. Select FAT32 from the "Filesystem" box and click "Add".

Hint: if you want to create additional partitions (e.g., for very large files under Linux), repeat the process outlined above accordingly. In this case, you may have to create so-called logical partitions. Please consult additional sources if you are unsure about how to do that.

To actually write the changes to disk, select "Edit | Apply All Operations" from the menu.

In the dialogue box that comes up, click "Apply".

Click the "Close" button.

Exit GParted.

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Installation-Frugal

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There are different ways to install Puppy:

Frugal Installation (Pupy CD image on hard drive)

  • Universal Installer
  • Manual Install

Other Ways

Frugal Installation is recommended if you have 256 MB RAM or more. If you have less than 256 MB RAM you should choose Full Installation.

Frugal Installation using Puppy Universal Installer

A Frugal Installation copies the image from the Puppy CD to the hard drive. At bootup, Puppy is loaded into your computer's memory (RAM) just as it is when you boot Puppy from CD, however, loading it from a hard drive is much faster. This way, Frugal Installation combines the advantages of booting from CD-ROM (protection from malware) and a hard drive bootup (speed). Moreover, upgrading to a new Puppy version is very simple - all you have to do is replace some files.

Start "Menu | Setup | Puppy universal installer". Choose which medium Puppy should be installed to. In this example, I chose the internal hard drive.

If you have several hard drives, select one.

Next, click on the button next to the partition that you want Puppy to be installed to - /hda2 in this example.

In the dialogue box, click "OK".

You now have to decide whether you want a "Frugal" or a "Full" installation. In our example, click on the "FRUGAL" button.

Now you change the installation directory. Just click on the "OK" button.

The files are now copied from CD to the hard drive.

The installation is finished. In the next two dialogue boxes, click "OK".

Since you now have two operating systems on your computer (Windows and Puppy Linux), you need a boot loader. The boot loader is the first program executed after switching the computer on. It enables you to specify which operating system should be started up. If Windows was the only operating system on your computer up to now, you do not have a boot loader. Start the installation of the boot loader GRUB with "Menu | System | Grub bootloader config".

Select "simple installation" and click "OK".

In the next dialogue box, select "standard" and click "OK".

Now you have to specify where the GRUB boot loader should store its files. These can only be written to a Linux file system partition. Thus, please specify one of the Linux (ext2 or ext3 file system) partitions you created (/dev/hda2 in the example). If you do not have a Linux file system partition yet, you need to create one.

Now you have to specify where the GRUB boot loader itself should be installed to. Select the Master Boot Record "MBR" and click "OK".

In the next dialogue box, click "OK".

The installation is complete. What remains to be done is to configure the GRUB boot loader so that Puppy Linux can be booted. This is how to do it:

Open the file "menu.lst". You will find this file in the /boot/grub directory of the partition you installed the GRUB files to (/dev/hda2 in our example). For Linux newbies, I include detailed instructions on how to find and open this file. More advanced users can skip ahead to where menu.lst gets edited.

Start "Menu | Filesystem | Pmount mount/unmount drives" and click on the button "MOUNT" next to "/dev/hda2".

The button changes to "UNMNT".

Start "Menu | Filesystem | ROX-Filer file filemanager".

Right-click with the mouse and choose "Window | Enter Path".

Enter the following path next to "Goto: /mnt/hda2/boot/grub/

You are now at the folder /mnt/hda2/boot/grub/

Use the right mouse button to click on the file called "menu.lst".

From the context menu that pops up, select "File menu.lst | Open As Text".

You can now see the contents of the menu.lst file.

Edit the file at this point:

title Puppy Linux 4.00 frugal (on /dev/hda2)
rootnoverify (hd0,1)
kernel /puppy400/vmlinuz pmedia=idehd psubdir=puppy400
initrd /puppy400/initrd.gz

(Notice: depending on what medium you boot from, you have to set the pmedia parameter to one of usbflash, usbhd, usbcd, ideflash, idehd, idecd, idezip, satahd, scsihd or scsicd. If you did not install the GRUB files to the /dev/hda2 partition, you need to change the rootnoverify parameter as well - partition number and Linux drive letter minus one, so if the GRUB files are on /dev/hdb3 (partition 3 in second drive hdb), make it "rootnoverify (hd1,2)".)

With the changed line, the grub entry should now look like this:

title Puppy Linux 4.00 frugal (on /dev/hda2)
rootnoverify (hd1,2)
kernel /puppy400/vmlinuz pmedia=idehd psubdir=puppy400
initrd /puppy400/initrd.gz

"Comment out", i.e. put a number sign (#) before the lines:that are no longer needed, like the following extra entries automatically written by Grub:

# Linux bootable partition config begins
title Linux (on /dev/hda3)
root (hd0,2)
kernel /boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/hda3 ro vga=normal
# Linux bootable partition config ends
# Linux bootable partition config begins
title Linux (on /dev/hda4)
root (hd0,3)
kernel /boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/hda4 ro vga=normal
# Linux bootable partition config ends

Save the file by selecting "File | Save" from the program's menu. Exit the text editor.

Close the ROX file manager.

Click on the button "UNMNT" next to /dev/hda2.

The button changes to "MOUNT".

Click on the button "QUIT".

Exit Puppy and reboot the computer: "Menu | Shutdown | Reboot computer".

When you reboot the computer, you will be asked whether you want to save the "session" (i.e., all the configuration changes you made). Hit Return to select the entry "SAVE TO FILE", which is already highlighted.

Confirm the next dialogue (Warning) by hitting Return.

In the next dialogue, select the "hda2" partition with the cursor keys and press Return.

Now. you will be asked, if the file should get a special filename. Just press Return.

You will be asked whether you want a normal (unencrypted) or an encrypted save file. Select "NORMAL" with the cursor keys and press Return.

The next dialogue lets you choose a size for your save file. A file size of 512 megabytes is usually sufficient. You can increase (but not decrease) this size anytime from within Puppy. Pick the desired file size with the cursor keys and press Return.

In the next screen you see a summary. Choose "Change Folder" and press return.

Next, you enter "/puppy400" as subfolder and confirm with return.

Again a summary is shown and if everything seems to be ok, choose "Yes, save" with the arrow keys, then press return.

Please be patient while the file is created.

Next you will be asked if Puppy 4.xx should test for serial devices at each boot. Choose ""No" with the arrow keys and confirm with return.

Now you decide wether the system file pup400.sfs should be copied over to the harddrive. Choose "Yes" with the arrow keys and confirm with return.

Last not least the computer restarts automatically. Remove the Puppy CD from the drive before the shutdown is complete. Upon reboot the boot loader will show up. Choose ""Puppy Linux 4.00 frugal (on /dev/hda2)"" with the arrow keys and confirm with return.

Manual Installation

To be able to use this option, a boot loader has to be installed on your computer. If there is no boot loader installed on your computer, I recommend doing so using the Puppy Universal Installer.

Boot Puppy fom CD with the "puppy pfix=ram" boot option.

Create a new directory "puppy400" onto a partition with a Linux file system (ext2/ext3) or a FAT32 file system.

Copy the files

pup_400.SFS
zdrv_400.SFS
initrd.gz
vmlinuz

into this directory. If you are updating Puppy, overwrite the existing files. Reconfigure the GRUB boot loader by editing the menu.lst file. You will usually find this file on a Linux partition in the /boot/grub folder.

Append the following two lines to the file menu.lst:

title Puppy Linux 4.00 frugal (on /dev/hda2)
rootnoverify (hd0,1)
kernel /puppy400/vmlinuz pmedia=idehd psubdir=puppy400
initrd /puppy400/initrd.gz

Notice: (hd0,1) signifies the hard disk and partition on which GRUB is stored. Depending on your boot medium, you will need to set the pmedia parameter to one of usbflash, usbhd, usbcd, ideflash, idehd, idecd, idezip, satahd, scsihd or scsicd.

Save the file menu.lst

Close the text editor. Remove the Puppy CD from the drive and exit Puppy without saving your session. Reboot the PC. Puppy should now boot without the CD in the drive.

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Installation-Full

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A Full Installation installs Puppy onto the hard drive like any other "normal" Linux. This kind of installation is a good idea if you have less than 256 MB of memory.

Start "Menu | Setup | Puppy universal installer". Select the medium that you want to install Puppy to. I chose the internal hard drive for this example.

If you have more than one hard drive, choose one.

Click the button next to the partition that you want to install Puppy to.

Confirm the next dialogue by clicking "OK".

You now have to decide whether you want a "Frugal" or a "Full" installation. Since this chapter describes a Full installation, click the button labelled "FULL".

The files will be copied from the CD to the hard drive.

Since you now have two operating systems on your computer (Windows and Puppy Linux), you need a boot loader. The boot loader is the first program executed after switching the computer on. It enables you to specify which operating system should be started up. If Windows was the only operating system on your computer up to now, you do not have a boot loader. The Puppy Installer can install GRUB as a boot loader for you. To do this, click on "INSTALL GRUB".

In the next dialogue box click "Install"

Confirm the next dialogue by clicking "OK".

Select "simple installation" and click "OK".

In the next dialogue box, select "standard" and click "OK".

Now you have to specify where the GRUB boot loader should store its files. These can only be written to a Linux file system partition. Thus, please type "/dev/hda2" - that is, the same partition to which Puppy has just been installed.

Now you have to specify where the GRUB boot loader itself should be installed to. Select the Master Boot Record "MBR" and click "OK".

Confirm the next dialogue by clicking "OK".

In the next dialogue box, click the "No" button.

The installation is complete. What remains to be done is to configure the GRUB boot loader so that Puppy Linux can be booted. This is how to do it:

Open the file "menu.lst". You will find this file in the /boot/grub directory of the partition you installed the GRUB files to (/dev/hda2 in our example). For Linux newbies, I include detailed instructions on how to find and open this file. More advanced users can skip ahead to where menu.lst gets edited.

Start "Menu | Filesystem | Pmount mount/unmount drives" and click on the button "MOUNT" next to "/dev/hda2".

The button changes to "UNMNT".

Start "Menu | Filesystem | ROX-Filer file filemanager".

Click with the right mouse button and choose "Window | Enter Path" from the context menu.

Type this into the box labelled "Goto" (do not omit the slash at the end): /mnt/hda2/boot/grub/

You are now inside the /mnt/hda2/boot/grub/ folder.

Use the right mouse button to click on the file called "menu.lst".

From the context menu that pops up, select "File menu.lst | Open As Text".

You can now see the contents of the menu.lst file.

# Start GRUB global section
#timeout 30
color light-gray/blue black/light-gray
# End GRUB global section
# Other bootable partition config begins
title Windows (on /dev/hda1)
rootnoverify (hd0,0)
makeactive
chainloader +1
# Other bootable partition config ends
# Linux bootable partition config begins
title Linux (on /dev/hda2)
root (hd0,1)
kernel /boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/hda2 ro vga=normal
# Linux bootable partition config ends
# Linux bootable partition config begins
# title Linux (on /dev/hda4)
# root (hd0,3)
# kernel /boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/hda4 ro vga=normal
# Linux bootable partition config ends

To include a display timeout, remove "#" from the start of the line of "timeout 30", and change the value, which is in seconds. Note that the entries "Other" will be for Windows (in /dev/hda1) and "Linux" will be for Linux (on /dev/hda2) - make sure to insert "Puppy" before the word "Linux"! If there are extra entries below (the extra entries are made when you have extra partitions or hard disks), you may ignore them or simply put "#" before the lines - this will hide the entries.

Save the file by selecting "File | Save" from the program's menu. Exit the text editor.

Close the ROX file manager.

Click on the button "UNMNT" next to /dev/hda2.

The button changes to "MOUNT".

Exit Puppy and reboot the computer: "Menu | Shutdown | Reboot computer".

When you reboot the computer, you will be asked whether you want to save the "session" (i.e., all the configuration changes you made). Select "DO NOT SAVE" with the cursor keys and hit Return.

Your computer will now shut down completely and then start up again. You will then see the boot loader come up. Select "Puppy Linux (on /dev/hda2)" with the cursor keys and press Return. Puppy boots up. At the first bootup, you will once again have to specify your country and your screen resolution. This configuration is saved so that you do not have to repeat this process at the next bootup.

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Internet Connection

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Modem

Start off clicking on "Menu | Network | PupDial modem dialup".

Next, enter the information from your provider.

DSL

First you should check if the ethernet-interface was detected.
Start a shell ("Menu | Utility | Rxvt terminal emulator") and enter the following command:
ifconfig

Can you see "eth0"?

If you can not see "eth0" enter the following command:
ifconfig eth0 up

To check if the ethernet-interface is available now, enter the following command:
ifconfig

Now you should see "eth0". Close the shell.
Start the program "Menu | Network | Roaring Penguin PPPoE".

Press the button "SETUP".

Enter your username (ask your provider), then press the return-key.

Enter the ethernet interface. eth0 is usually correct so you can press the return-key.

At the next question you confirm the default "no" and press the return-key.

Then you have to enter your IP adress. If you get a dynamic IP adress press the return-key only.

Now enter your password (ask your provider).

Enter your password again.

Choose "1" as a "standalone" firewall.

Now you can see your input again. If everything is alrigth press the key "y".

If you want to connect the internet-connection press the button "Start".

A message box opens and you get connected. Press the return-key.

You can now open the Internet browser "Menu | Internet | SeaMonkey Webbrowser". Enter a URL and see if the Internet site is displayed.

If you want to disconnect the internet-connection press the button "Stop".

A message box opens and you get disconnected. Press the return-key.

Wireless LAN

To connect your Puppy to a wireless network take the following steps: Step 1

Click on the "connect" icon on your Desktop, then click "Connect to the Internet by network interface"

.....OR.......

Click on Menu / Setup / Network Wizard

If Puppy recognizes your interface, it will be displayed in the upper portion of the box.

Just click the button for your interface and see step 2 below.

If puppy does not see your interface you will have to load the appropriate module with the Load Module button

If you are unsure, click the "more" tab to Auto-probe drivers, or to install a Windows driver.

After you have loaded the correct module for your interface, it will show up in the first box seen above.

Click on it and proceed to step 2

Step 2

Configuring Network Interface

Click the Wireless button

Click Scan ( Or enter the information for your interface if you know it)

Click on your Network from the list that appears . Click Save. Enter your WEP / WPA key if on a secured network.

Then click Use This Profile. Click the Test button to see if Puppy see`s a "live" connection. If it does, then click

Auto DHCP. If successful Puppy will ask you if you want to save the configuration for next boot. Choose yes or no.

Click Done on the box that appears, and you`re all set!

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Setup EMail

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Start the program "Menu | Internet | SeaMonkey mail and news". The configuration depends on your email-provider. In the following you will find an example for GMX.

After you press the button "Finish" the program automatically downloads your emails from your email account. If you are offline, the following error message appears:

Start an Internet-connection and click (in the Seamonkey-Mail-Programm) on the button "Get new messages".

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Setup Devices (Printer, Keyboard)

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Puppy Linux has Setup in the Menu that contains many ways of setting up your different devices. Examples are given below for setting up printer and keyboard.

Printer

This is an easy one to get up and running.Just run "Menu | Setup | Printer Wizard" and the directions there should be sufficient to get most printers working.If your printer is not on the list that comes up try one that is similar for example if you have an superjet 23e try the superjet 23 or superjet 23f.

Keyboard layout

If you are using Xvesa as your video server and you do not have a US keyboard, you need to customise the keyboard layout. Start "Menu | Document | Geany text editor" and copy the following lines into it for a German keyboard layout.

clear shift

clear lock

clear control

clear mod1

clear mod2

clear mod3

!clear mod4

!clear mod5

!de-latin1.map: German keymap

keycode 9 = Escape Escape

keycode10 = 1 exclam

keycode11 = 2 quotedbl twosuperior

keycode12 = 3 section threesuperior

keycode13 = 4 dollar dollar

keycode14 = 5 percent

keycode15 = 6 ampersand

keycode16 = 7 slash braceleft

keycode17 = 8 parenleft bracketleft

keycode18 = 9 parenright bracketright

keycode19 = 0 equal braceright

keycode20 = ssharp question backslash

keycode21 = dead_acute dead_grave

keycode22 = BackSpace Delete

keycode23 = Tab Tab

keycode24 = q Q at

keycode25 = w

keycode26 = e E currency EuroSign

keycode27 = r

keycode28 = t

keycode29 = z

keycode30 = u

keycode31 = i

keycode32 = o

keycode33 = p

keycode34 = udiaeresis Udiaeresis

keycode35 = plus asterisk dead_tilde

keycode36 = Return

keycode37 = Control_L

keycode38 = a

keycode39 = s

keycode40 = d

keycode41 = f

keycode42 = g

keycode43 = h

keycode44 = j

keycode45 = k

keycode46 = l

keycode47 = odiaeresis Odiaeresis

keycode48 = adiaeresis Adiaeresis

keycode49 = dead_circumflex degree

keycode50 = Shift_L

keycode51 = numbersign apostrophe

keycode52 = y

keycode53 = x

keycode54 = c

keycode55 = v

keycode56 = b

keycode57 = n

keycode58 = m M mu

keycode59 = comma semicolon

keycode60 = period colon Multi_key

keycode61 = minus underscore

keycode62 = Shift_R

keycode63 = KP_Multiply

keycode64 = Alt_L Meta_L

keycode65 = space space

keycode66 = Caps_Lock

keycode67 = F1 F11

keycode68 = F2 F12

keycode69 = F3 F13

keycode70 = F4 F14

keycode71 = at F15

keycode72 = bar F16

keycode73 = dead_tilde F17

keycode74 = currency EuroSign F18

keycode75 = braceleft F19

keycode76 = braceright F20

keycode77 = Num_Lock

keycode78 = Scroll_Lock

keycode79 = KP_7

keycode80 = KP_8

keycode81 = KP_9

keycode82 = KP_Subtract

keycode83 = KP_4

keycode84 = KP_5

keycode85 = KP_6

keycode86 = KP_Add

keycode87 = KP_1

keycode88 = KP_2

keycode89 = KP_3

keycode90 = KP_0

keycode91 = KP_Decimal

keycode94 = less greater bar

keycode95 = bracketleft F11

keycode96 = bracketright F12

keycode98 = Up

!keycode99 = Prior

keycode 100 = Left

keycode 102 = Right

!keycode 104 = Down

keycode 105 = Control_R

keycode 106 = KP_Divide

keycode 108 = Alt_R

keycode 110 = Home

keycode 112 = Prior

keycode 113 = Left

keycode 114 = Right

keycode 115 = End

keycode 116 = Down

keycode 117 = Next

keycode 133 = Alt_L

keycode 134 = Alt_R

add shift = Shift_L Shift_R

add lock = Caps_Lock

add control = Control_L Control_R

add mod1 = Alt_L Alt_R

add mod2 = Mode_switch

add mod3 = Num_Lock

!add mod4 =

!add mod5 =

Save this file as .Xmodmap into the /root directory (please note that the first character of the file name should indeed be a dot). Then restart the X server by selecting "Menu | Shutdown | Restart X Server" (alternatively, you can open a console and issue the "xmodmap /root/.Xmodmap" command). Now the äöüÄÖÜ umlauts are available. The special characters @|~ have been assigned to the function keys F5, F6 and F7 (F7 has to be pressed twice to make the tilde appear). The {}[] brackets are located on function keys F9 to F12.

You can create country-specific keyboard layouts of your own by editing that file. To find out the correct keycodes, open a console and enter the "xev" command. The keycode of any key you press and its assigned character will then be displayed.

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